Leave an Impression
Research and Source

I would like to identify and give appreciation to the following websites:

www.linotype.com

www.fontshop.com

www.anguishedrepose.wordpress.com

www.idsgn.org

www.sanskritweb.net

www.monotypefonts.com

www.ascendercorp.com

www.myfonts.com

All the above sites has helped with my research, increasing my understanding of typography politics.

Robin Nicholas & Patricia Saunders, there comparison of Arial against Max Miedinger’s Helvetica.
Helvetica - Line 1
Arial - Line 2
Untl now I have never paid attention to the fonts Arial and Helvetica maybe because I don’t really use Arial, but I will now.

Robin Nicholas & Patricia Saunders, there comparison of Arial against Max Miedinger’s Helvetica.

Helvetica - Line 1

Arial - Line 2

Untl now I have never paid attention to the fonts Arial and Helvetica maybe because I don’t really use Arial, but I will now.

Patricia Saunders

I must admit typography design/designers never even entered in to my head through out my experience of my design career, but researching some of these designers has been very interesting as the politics that surrounds it all goes deeper than we perceive.

Here we have our very own Typography Designer from the United Kingdom, Patricia Saunders.

Patricia Saunders did not have a great library of font designs but became famous for aiding the development of the font Sonoran which was designed by Robin Nicholas in the early 1980s, which we all know as to be Arial.

Patricia Saunders also designed the following:
Columbus
Corsiva Monotype
Monotype Corsiva
Monotype Janson

Like I said not a large library of fonts, but she was part of the centre of attention that a 10 man team lead by Robin Nicholas and Patricia Saunders took the famous Helvetica font and adjusted slightly to create a new font we know as Arial.

This font has been adopted by Microsoft and now become its default font.

A lot of suggestions say that this font was created to avoided expensive licensing fees from Helvetica.

Now I am not a great designer and sometimes use other work to influence my own, but after researching this Typographer Designer along with her font, I have slightly lost a bit of respect for the font called Arial.

Yes it is used all over the world and I can never design something as powerful as Helvetica but these small tweeks by Nicholas and Saunders feels a bit dishonourable.

I don’t know, may be I don’t know what I’m talking about.

Can you tell what it is?

Can you tell what it is?

Research and Source

I would like to identify and give appreciation to the following websites:

www.books.google.co.uk

www.fontshop.com

www.identifont.com

www.linotype.com

www.new.myfonts.com

www.nicksherman.com

www.press.princeton.edu

www.typophile.com

All the above sites has helped with my research, increasing my understanding of typography development.

Chauncey H. Griffith

From what I can gather from research Mr Griffith was a very serious man, a very ambitious man, increasing his level and stature from a pressman, to vice president in a matter of years.

But climbing an occupational ladder wasn’t his only strength, it was the growth and aid in legibility in his day and age, working closely with William Addison Dwiggins and Rudolph Ruzicka, creating and developing fonts/typography for newspapers and telephone books/directories, that would change and influence the industry today.

In his time I can see why he deserved respect without even asking for it, as working with Linotype machines were far from simple, unlike the press machines we use today.

I believe being able to know and understand the Linotype machine as a whole, enabled him to be the best typography designer he could be, simply because he knew where the strengths and weaknesses of the Linotype machine lied, enabling him to compensate where ever needed.

Chauncey H. Griffiths is a man that gets my respect all day long, as I see him as a person who identifies a problem then rectifies it, not only just completing a task but leaving an impression that will influence the future to come.